It is illegal to possess animals that can infect humans with rabies. If you have any questions about the Rabies Act, please contact the Ministry of Health. Animals whose possession is illegal under this Act are: Bats Skunk Foxes Raccoons Coyotes This database contains the current legislation of the State of Western Australia. The Western Australian Parliament maintains the official website of Western Australian legislation through the State Law Publisher. All material contained herein is reproduced with permission, but does not purport to be the official or authorized version. This is the date that AustLII last updated this database and does not necessarily indicate the currency of the database. This database is updated with data provided to AustLII by State Law Publisher every two weeks. AustLII aims to publish this information within one day of receipt. Changes made since the date of last data receipt are not available in this database. Technological advances related to increasing computerization, the development of electronic databases, the Internet, the electronic transmission/dissemination of regulatory information and digital publishing would continue to have an impact on the State-owned legal publisher and the printing industry in general.

Publication requirements for Parliament were maintained, but with publications now born digitally and published online. Whereas previously between 3,000 and 4,000 copies of the Government Gazette were printed each week, only six copies are printed, one for the Ministry`s archives, one for subscribers and the other as legal deposit copies for libraries and archives. Through fast and on-demand printing services, public requests for documents such as official gazettes and laws are processed on demand. Although the public can now print laws online from the legislative website, to be considered a legal copy, a document must still be printed by the state`s law publisher. The outsourcing of State Law Publisher to private companies continued, particularly in the production of works more suitable for offset printing, with State Law Publisher assuming a contract management role to ensure quality control and delivery of these documents to its clients. It is illegal to own animals that pose a threat to humans, livestock or domestic animals. For a complete list of animals whose possession is illegal under the Animal Welfare Act, please see the definitions page. Some of the animals that it is illegal to own under this law are: Lions Tiger Pumas Wolves Bears Monkeys (non-human primates) Common marmosets Lemurs Cobras Rattlesnakes Crocodiles Alligators Many animals are illegal to own, transport and import into Washington State. There are several government agencies that regulate pet ownership.

Please contact the agency mentioned in the law to request more information about this law. It is illegal to own wild animals. If you have any questions about the Wildlife Act, please contact the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Some of the animals that it is illegal to own under this law are: Deer elk Bobbcats Some of the birds that it is illegal to own under this law are: Falcons Quail (except Coturnix) Pheasants Chukar Grouse It is illegal to own animals that may harm the environment or native wildlife. If you have any questions about the Harmful Alien Wildlife Act, please contact the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Some of the animals whose possession is illegal under this law are: Mute swans Mungo Boar Javelina Wild goats Wild sheep Wildebeest Reindeer Deer It is illegal to own animals that pose a threat to humans, livestock or domestic animals. For a complete list of animals whose possession is illegal under the Animal Welfare Act, please see the definitions page. It is illegal to own wild animals. If you have any questions about the Wildlife Act, please contact the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. This did not appease the private sector, and PATEFA launched a massive campaign – distributing a “survival kit” to its members and placing full-page notices in the newspaper addressing Western Australian taxpayers calling for the closure of the State Printing Division.

The government responded by placing its own ads in the newspaper to reinforce the need for state-owned printing and counter criticism by saying that PATEFA`s campaign was motivated by a Liberal Party campaign promise to increase its electoral chances and fearing it would lose its share of the work ordered. if the state printing department continues and is allowed to upgrade. This latest agitation by PATEFA, which not only adapted and felt threatened by internal restructuring, prompted the staff of the State Printing Office to take their complaints to the public and to the steps of Parliament in September 1988. With this success and expansion, the pervasive tensions between government and private printing and the Liberal government will resurface. However, Davies` leadership and tenacity were instrumental in resisting pressure from the Liberal government of the day to outsource government printing to private industry, which was part of its campaign promise to the Master Printers Association. For now, Davies` operations and credibility have survived internal investigations: the Western Australian Government recognises the traditional stewards of all of Western Australia and their enduring connection to the land, waters and community. We honour all members of Indigenous communities and their cultures. and for seniors, past and present.

With the unfolding of the 1960s, the social liberations that were experienced and introduced into the wider community began to have an impact on the walls of the government printing press. With a staff that now includes around 80 women, the growing popularity of the miniskirt has begun to be felt in the workplace.